Extensive list of weather control patents prove the technology exists to augment and control powerful storms

Wednesday, September 20, 2017 by

Extreme weather events like Hurricane Harvey in Texas and Hurricane Irma in Florida seem to be on the upswing, and some people are now asking themselves: is there more to these types of storms than meets the eye? A quick perusal of the government’s many patents and trademarks for weather modification and “geoengineering” suggests that the powers that be, indeed, have covert tools at their disposal that are capable of affecting and perhaps even controlling certain elements of the weather.

Compiled by GeoEngineeringWatch.org, the list dates back to 1891 and offers some keen insights as to what the “deep state” could be up to in terms of creating severe weather events. The earliest known patent, filed on July 16, 1891, is entitled, “Method of Producing Rain-fall.” It explains how the rapid evaporation and air chilling can be used to create condensation in the atmosphere – cloud-seeding, so to speak – thus producing more rain. A man by the name of Louis Gathmann of Chicago, Illinois, is credited as being the inventor of this technique.

Several decades later on August 6, 1913, another patent was filed by a man named James M. Cordray for a “Rain-Maker” balloon that can supposedly produce rain at any given time, even during dry seasons. Several others of the earliest known geoengineering patents, in fact, all pertain to creating artificial rain, clouds, and even fog, including from moving aircraft, as is the case with unexplained “chemtrail” emissions.

There are patents that outline technologies for creating smoke and other aerial discharges as well, including one specific patent filed on April 24, 1951, that plainly outlines a “process for controlling weather.” Numerous patents filed after this one detail the apparatus for disseminating weather modification “material.”

Patent from 1987 proves that HAARP is used to alter and manipulate weather patterns

The patents become more plenteous and bizarre the further down the timeline they go. In the late 1950s, there are patents for weather modification dispersion devices and fuel decomposition chambers. There are also patents for cloud seeding technologies, aerosol containers, particle dispensers, precipitation sprayers, and irradiation machines, as well as air purification techniques and methods for generating “ice nuclei smoke particles,” again for the purpose of modifying climate conditions.

By the 1970s, patents for “biologically active chemicals” become apparent, as do patents for altering atmospheric precipitation. There’s even a patent that was filed on August 11, 1987 for “HAARP,” also known as the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program.

HAARP is considered by many to be a covert weather manipulation program, and this particular patent seems to point to this being true. Its very title explains that the purpose of the HAARP patent is to serve as a “method and apparatus for altering a region in the earth’s atmosphere, ionosphere, and/or magnetosphere.”

The relevance of this to storms like Harvey and Irma is that technologies like HAARP could have been a factor in the way they formed, their intensity, and where they traveled. This can’t necessarily be proven, of course, but the patent list suggests that it’s at the very least possible, should someone with the capacity to use it decide to do so.

The general public may never truly know the extent of these types of weather modification techniques, including how effective or useful they are. Are entire storms being generated by them, or do they simply piggy-back on existing storms and steer them, or make them stronger (or weaker) depending upon the intended target? Or are all of these patents simply random inventions concocted by inquiring minds, and never actually intended to be used in real life?

Sources for this article include:

GeoEngineeringWatch.org

FreePatentsOnline.com

FreePatentsOnline.com

Google.com

Google.com

USPTO.gov

NaturalNews.com



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